Why does Council need a Tree Management Framework?

Trees are major contributing items to public landscapes and recreation spaces, they can provide a sense of place or be local landmarks and as community assets, often cause emotive responses. Trees in the urban environment also attract costly regular maintenance and a Tree Management Framework outlines how Council will manage its trees and sets criteria so that management is consistent and justified. The framework also provides objectives, targets and an action plan outlining how tree management will be carried out into the future.


Why do we need street and reserve trees?

Trees in the urban environment provide character and amenity and can improve the overall liveability of the city. Trees are an integral part of the local landscape and provide numerous social, environmental and economic benefits. Two themes of Council’s Community Vision are Liveability and Valuing Nature, developing its street and reserve trees contribute to achieving these visions for the community.

When will the community be consulted for tree removal/planting?

When Council removes and plants trees it will engage the local community in line with its community engagement process. The level of consultation will change dependent on the size and specifics of the project.


Why focus on increasing tree planting?

When compared to a number of other metropolitan councils, City of Marion have considerably less street trees per square kilometre. This means that canopy coverage is less and streetscapes are hotter. Functional characteristics of trees include absorbing carbon, improving air quality and providing shade to reducing streetscape temperatures. More trees will lead to more comfortable streetscapes and public spaces throughout Marion.

When will Council remove the tree adjacent my property?

Tree removal is guided by arboricultural assessment and criteria of the Tree Management Framework. Generally, trees are only removed where they are dead, dying, dangerous or proven to be causing property damage. If the tree is healthy and presents an acceptable level of risk, it is likely to be retained so that it can continue to provide all of its benefits

Why are the trees in my street inconsistent in age and species?

Tree removal is guided by arboricultural assessment and the Tree Management Framework. Generally, trees are only removed and replaced where they are dead, dying, dangerous or proven to be causing property damage. The life expectancy for each tree varies based on its type and environment, those that have reached their useful life expectancy are replaced while others continue to provide all of the benefits as large and mature tree. The result of staged tree replacement is two generations of trees in the street, often of two or more tree types. Council’s tree species palette continues to evolve based on the performance of particular species and planting site parameters. The suggested street and reserve tree replacement palette is outlined in the Tree Management Framework from page 26.